Lesson 5 - The Family (Part 1)

In this lesson we will be learning some Arabana words to talk about family.

There are lots of words for family in Arabana, so in this lesson we will learn only some of them. More words for family will be learnt in future lessons. At the end of the lesson we will use these new words in sentences and practice talking about ourselves and our families.

Words for family

Arabana
English
Parents
lhuka
mother
apityi
father
Children
wardu
child
wiya
boy
kuya
girl
Siblings
nhuthi
brother
nhuthi-kali
older brother
kaku
sister
kaku-kali
older sister
kupaka
younger brother/younger sister
upatya
younger brother/younger sister/younger cousin
Grandparents
thanthi
grandfather (mother's father)
kadnhini
grandmother (mother's mother)
kadnhini
grandfather (father's father)
amanya
grandmother (father's mother)

NOTE: Grandmother may also be called pilya or pilya-pilya by her grandsons.

Uncle and Aunt
kakaka
mother's brother
ngiya
father's brother
ngawilyi
father's sister

NOTE: Ngawilyi can be pronounced as ngawilya by some speakers of Arabana.

Other family
nhupa
husband/wife
nhupa-mara
married couple
mita-mita
boyfriend/girlfriend

Talking about yourself and your family

If you want to let people know that you are an Arabana person, you can say the following.

Antha nharla Arabana.
I'm an Arabana person.

Here are some words that you can use when introducing yourself.

nharla
man/person
udlyurla
woman
wiya
boy
kuya
girl

NOTE: Udlyurla can also be said as ulyurla.

Some practice sentences

You can practice using words for your family at home. Here is a sentence to get someone to come quickly.

Kakuai is kaku ‘sister’ said with an excited tone. Kalka means ‘quickly’, anari means ‘this way’, and yuka means ‘come’ (yuka can also mean ‘go’ in other sentences).

Kakuai! Kalka anari yuka!
Sister! Come here quick!

This sentence can be said to introduce someone.

Anthunha means ‘my’ as in ‘my girlfriend’ and –nha is used at the end of ‘Julia’ to show that it is a name.

Mita-mita anthunha Julia-nha.
My girlfriend’s name is Julia.

These two questions could be used when you are at a family gathering and want to know who people are and how they are related.

Wara means ‘who’, awarda means ‘there’ and ankunha means ‘your’.

Wara-nha ankunha kaku?
Who is your sister?
Wara awarda?
Who is that?

Here is one way to answer the question above.

Anthunha means ‘my’ and awarda means ‘there’.

Kadnhini anthunha awarda.
That there is my grandmother.

Arabana numbers

When talking about your family, you might like to mention how many family members you have. Here are the numbers in Arabana.

nguyu
one
parkulu
two
kulpari
three
nhuka
many (more than three)

Here is how you would tell someone how many younger siblings you have.

kupaka nguyu
one younger sibling
kupaka parkulu
two younger siblings
kupaka kulpari
three younger siblings

This sentence can be said by an adult to mean that they have a lot of children, grandchildren and other family.

Antha means 'I', wardu means ‘children’, nhuka means ‘many’ and –purru means ‘have’.

Antha wardu nhuka-purru.
I have a big family (with many children).

The following conversation might occur when you are talking with someone about a relative.

Ankunha means ‘your’. Parra-parra means ‘tall’. Anthunha means ‘my’, piri-piri means ‘short’. Arayi means ‘yes’, padni means ‘no’.

Apityi ankunha parra-parra?
Is your father tall?
Arayi, apityi anthunha parra-parra.
Yes, my father is tall.
Padni, apityi anthunha piri-piri.
No, my father is short.

Describing sentences

Here is a sentence to describe a family member’s appearance.

Anthunha means ‘my’ as in ‘my child’. Wiri means ‘hair’, –arla means ‘really, very’, miltyaardi means ‘eyes’.

Wardu anthunha wiri waka-arla, miltyaardi ngadlyuru.
My child has really black hair and green eyes.

Here are the Arabana colours. See if you can use these when describing yourself and your family members.

waka
black
warru
white
ngadlyuru
green
miraka
red
mathu
yellow
arkapa
brown

Here are a couple of ways to say ‘deadly’ in Arabana. Try to use these words as part of your conversation about family.

This word is used when someone has done something really well.

Ukarai!
Deadly!

This word is used when someone is looking really great (maybe they have new clothes or a nice haircut).

Karlti-karlti!
Deadly!

Once you have finished this lesson, write a few short sentences about yourself and your family based on these examples.